Euphoria in Raja Ampat

10% off any trip booked 6 months or more in advance.

Euphoria is a new phinisi (traditional Indonesian schooner) for 14 guests in 5 double or twin cabins and 2 master cabins with their own balcony (16 persons are possible for a full charter). Built in South Sulawesi, It was created from the noblest species of tropical trees (teak, iron wood, merbau), modernly equipped and comfortably decorated.

Visiting the famed areas of Raja Ampat and the newly discovered Cenderwasih area with the famous whale shark encounters this is a great mid range boat to show you the best that those areas have to offer.

With all modern amenities and air conditioned en-suite cabins this is a great boat to visit these stunning areas with.

Euphoria spends all year round in the West Papua area, half the year in Cenderawasih and half the year in Raja Ampat.
Although the boat is relatively new, the crew have many years experience in the area and the cruise director is probably one of the most experienced guides in the Cenderawasih area having worked and lived there for years before it became known for it's amazing whale shark encounters.

Euphoria - prices

Inquiry

Full pricing is available on the schedule here.
Prices are per person in Euros based on a twin or double sharing occupancy

Raja Ampat and Cenderawasih Nights Double / Twin Master
2016-18 11 nights Euro 3,300 Euro 3,550

Bookings made more than 6 months in advance are eligible for a 10% discount on the above prices making it E2,970 for the double/twin cabin and E3,195 for the Master cabin.

All prices are per person based on 2 persons in one cabin.

The price includes:

11 nights on board

All meals and beverages (excluding alcohol).

Transfers between airport and yacht.

Shore visit on islands (beaches, villages, Pearl Farm in Raja Ampat)

The price does not include:

Port clearance and entrance fee to Raja Ampat currently 190 USD - it’s a subject to change

Entrance fee to Cenderawasih Bay is currently 700 000 Rp (+/-75 USD)gulp –watch

Domestic flights to Sorong and back (Jakarta-Sorong back +/- 450 Euros) or

Domestic flights to Manokwari and back (Jakarta-Manokwari via Makassar and back +/- 550 Euro)

Indonesian visa on arrival - 30days 25 USD - paid at the aiport upon arrival in Indonesia but most nationalities are now free

Alcoholic beverages

Equipment rental $250 per person for the cruise

Other (kayaking, watersking, wakeboarding, fishing equipment)

Nitrox is not available on Euphoria at this time.

Equipment rental costs $ 250 for full set per trip

  • BCD 10 USD/day
  • regulator 10 USD/day
  • mask and fins 10 USD/day
  • mask or fins 5 USD/day
  • torch 5 USD/day

Whole set from above for a trip 250 USD - does not include a dive computer - these are mandatory and must be brought by the guest on the trip as they are not available for rent on board.

Euphoria - schedule

Inquiry
29Apr17
10May17
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
15May17
26May17
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
6 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
31May17
11Jun17
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
19Jun17
30Jun17
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
fully booked
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
30Aug17
10Sep17
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
fully booked
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
14Sep17
25Sep17
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
29Sep17
10Oct17
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
8 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
14Oct17
25Oct17
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
fully booked
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
29Oct17
07Nov17
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
fully booked
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
11Nov17
24Nov17
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
fully booked
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
28Nov17
07Dec17
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
fully booked
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
11Dec17
19Dec17
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
available only for charters
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
23Dec17
03Jan18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
fully booked
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
08Jan18
19Jan18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
24Jan18
02Feb18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
fully booked
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
06Feb18
15Feb18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
available only for charters
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
19Feb18
26Feb18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
fully booked
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
01Mar18
08Mar18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
fully booked
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
12Mar18
23Mar18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
28Mar18
08Apr18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
12Apr18
23Mar18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
28Apr18
09May18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
14May18
25May18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
29May18
09Jun18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
13Jun18
24Jun18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
04Sep18
15Sep18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
19Sep18
30Sep18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
05Oct18
16Oct18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
20Oct18
31Oct18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
05Nov18
16Nov18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
21Nov18
02Dec18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
06Dec18
17Dec18
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros
22Dec18
02Jan19
Embark: Sorong
Disembark: Sorong
Raja Ampat
14 places available
Booking Request
Price from 3300 Euros

Euphoria - cabins

Inquiry

14 guests in 5 double or twin cabins and 2 master cabins with their own balcony (16 persons are possible for a full charter)

Euphoria - itinerary

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Sample Raja Ampat itinerary Day 1

Picking up a group from the airport in Sorong, boarding on the ship, buying a pass for the park (around 1,000 000rp = 110 USD).

Day 2

CDiving: „Sardin Reef”, „Middle Reef”, „Kri Island”, „Sunset Cape”.

Day 3

Diving: “Hidden Reef”, “Manta Station”, “Mansuar’s West Cape”, night diving: “Home Reef”, visiting Suwandarek village on the Mansuar Island.

Day 4

Diving: “Manta Run”, “Manta Station”, Strait of Gam; evening trip around the Penemu Island and camfire on the beach of one of the small islands.

Day 5

Diving: „2 rocks”, „South Penemu Strait”, visiting „Hidden Bay” - a hidden bay inside of the island.

Day 6

Diving: „Lagoon”, „North Penemu”, trip into Kawe Islands direction.

Day 7

Diving: „Eagle Rock”, „West Kawe”, reaching the peak of Bala Bala Island with an impressing view on Raja Ampat Islands, trip into Wayag Islands while crossing the equator („From the South to the North”), diving near by the monitoring station.

Day 8

Visiting „Rocky Bay”, hiking in the mountains, diving: „Batu 5”, Batu 4”, „Batu 3”.

Day 9

Islands: Urania and Quoi, diving in the reef around, exploration of a cave.

Day 10

Diving in the reef nearby the Kawe Island, crossing the equator („From the North to the South”), reaching the Aljuwi Bay.

Day 11

Visiting the pearls’ farm with shopping possibilities, diving: Aljuwi, Woh Island and the way back to Sorong.

Day 12

Departure from Sorong.

Sorong is the harbour town in West Papua and the normal departure point to dive Raja Ampat. If you are unsure of how toget to Sorong to start your trip it will depend on where your inTernational flight into Indonesia is landing.

It is generally not possible for someone outside of Indonesia to purchase domestic flights in Indonesia so these can be purchased for you by us, if you would like, and added to your invoice. It will be about E 450 return dependant on exchange rates, availability and where your entry airport is in Indonesia. We recommend coming through Jakarta as the quickest and easiest route to take. The cost of the domestic flights are not included in the trip price.

Premier liveaboard diving and its local flight agent can purchase the tickets on your behalf, however, in doing so, Premier liveaboard diving is only acting as an agent for the airline and is not responsible for, and can accept no responsibility for, cancellations, delays, schedule changes, or problems caused by the air carrier.

We highly recommend trip interruption and cancellation insurance.

The area known as Raja Ampat(or the Four Kings) is an archipelago consisting of the islands of Misoool, Salawati, Batanta, and Wiageo which are surrounded by over 1,500 smallislands and cays. Formerly known as Irian Jaya, this area is now part of the newly named West Papua province of Indonesia and is located on the northwest tip of Bird’s Head Peninsula, on the island of New Guinea.

Put simply, Raja Ampat could quite possibly be the best diving in the world. It certainly is the world’s most biodiverse marine region with more recorded fish, coral and mollusk species than anywhere else on Earth.

According to the Conservation InTernational Rapid Assessment Bulletin the marine life diversity for diving in Irian Jaya is considerably greater than all other areas sampled in the Coral Triangle. The Raja Ampat area is considered home to more than 1,000 fish species, 101 of which were previously unknown in Raja Ampat and four that are new to all of Indonesia. A world record 284 sightings on one single dive was set at Kofiau Island. A benchmark figure for an excellent dive site is 200 fish species sightings, this was surpassed on 51% of Raja Ampat dives! There were 537 coral species and 699 mollusk species - again another world high.

The variety of marine life can be staggering. Some areas boast enormous schools of fish and regular sightings of sharks, such as wobbegongs. In Mansuar, you may encounter large groups of manta rays and turtles. From the boat and often close to shore you may get the chance to don your snorkeling gear for some unforgettable interaction with resident pods of dolphins or even some passing whales. Other highlights include the innumerable war wrecks, both ships and planes (with new wrecks being discovered constantly),

The reefs of Raja Ampat are just as varied as the marine life. There are vertical walls, reef flats, slopes, sea mounts, mucky mangroves, lagoons and pinnacles. The reefs are in pristine condition with miles of perfect hard corals and many varied colorful species of soft corals.

The diving is predominantly drift dives due to the moderate prevalent currents in the area which provide nutrients for the myriad fish and coral. Currents average moderate and vary from none to very strong. Due to these currents and the number of wrecks, Irian Jaya is not really considered a destination for absolute beginners, rather for divers with a few dives under their weightbelts looking to get away from the crowds. Visibility is normally very good but can vary and is normally at its best earlier in the day so your pre-breakfast dives are not to be slept through!

The pristine beauty of the area, both above and below the water is truly unrivalled. This success of area’s staggering abundance of marine life can also be attributed to the areas incredibly low human population density. Its remote location and lack of infrastructure have inhibited the growth of tourism.

This is truly “Frontier Diving”. Topside the beautiful islands stretch as far as you can see and are largely uninhabited. At night the lights of local fishing boats twinkle in the dark along the few inhabited shorelines while in more remote areas you may only see a distant spec of light over the entire horizon.

Not many liveaboards dive the Raja Ampat area, making this adventure even more unique and special. The newly constructed Euphoria is the perfect platform that delivers modern comforts and outstanding service to adventurers exploring this remote outpost of civilization - Raja Ampat diving photos

Euphoria Sample Cenderawasih Itinerary

These trips are still quite exploratory but of course the highlight is diving with the whalesharks. Dive sites around the area are constantly being discovered and this trip should be treated as one of discovery safe in the knowledge that you are on a first class destination in one of the world’s newest hot spots for diving.

Cenderawasih Bay :

a new dive destination on the world dive map for up close and personal whale shark encounters! The whale shark is the biggest fish in the world, which impresses and attracts divers with its charm and majesty. While eating only plankton and small fish - the whale shark is completely harmless to humans. Unfortunately its existence is in risk, due to humans’ activities and a low birth rate. Those giants can live even up to 100 years. To follow the whale shark we reach the Cenderawasih National Park, situated in the Cenderawasih Bay, on the north part of Indonesian’s province West Papua. The park, founded in 1993, has a size of 1 400 000 hectares and is the largest marine park in the whole Indonesia. The name “Cenderawasih” comes from the bird of paradise, which is a symbol of Papua. The park is located 250 kilometres away from Manokwari and includes pristine coast and dozens of inhabited islands. The closest villages are situated on bigger islands: Yap, Rumberpon, Roon and Mioswar.

Sample Itinerary -

Day 1

Picking up a group from the airport in Manokwari, boarding on the ship, buying a pass for the Marine Park Cenderawasih (around 500 000rp = 55 USD).

Day 2

Mioswar Island, diving on the nearby reef, a trip to the hot springs and bathe in the warm river.

Day 3

Roon Island, diving: “North Cape”, “Underwater Rocks”, visiting the village Yende and “Shallow Dive”.

Day 4

Wasior waterfall, Aysemdami waterfall, diving: “Selat Roon”.

Day 5

Auri Islands, camping and campfire on the Kaka/Kaki Island.

Day 6

Matas Island and the Isle of Kwom.

Day 7

Searching for whale sharks.

Day 8

Roon Island, camping and campfire.

Day 9

A lonely reef in the middle of the Cenderawasih Bay.

Day 10

Purup Island.

Day 11

Wreck diving in Manokwari.

Day 12

Departure from Manokwari.

Cendarawasih trips can start or end in Manokwari in Northern Papua or start or end in Sorong on the North west coast of Papua dependant on the itinerary you choose, the itineraries are Sorong to Manokwari, Manokwari to Manokwari or Manokwari to Sorong.

Sorong is a harbour town in West Papua and sometimes the departure point for the Cendrawasih discovery trips ending in Manokwari. If you are unsure of how to get to Sorong to start your trip it will depend on where your inTernational flight into Indonesia is landing.

The trip itinerary can also be from Manokwari to Manokwari or from Manokwari to Sorong again dependant on the trip itinerary you choose. Manokwari is accessed through Sorong also and the flight times will be dependant on the day your trip starts but either way you will need to get to Sorong first using the flights below.

It is not possible for someone outside of Indonesia to purchase domestic flights in Indonesia so these can be purchased for you by us, if you would like, and added to your invoice. It will be $750 return from Jakarta, the preferred entry point for your inTernational flight into Indonesia. We recommend coming through Jakarta as the quickest and easiest route to take. The cost of the domestic flights are not included in the trip price but will be added to your invoice unless stated otherwise. Premier liveaboard diving and its local flight agent can purchase the tickets on your behalf, however, in doing so, Premier liveaboard diving is only acting as an agent for the airline and is not responsible for, and can accept no responsibility for, cancellations, delays, schedule changes, or problems caused by the air carrier.

Premier liveaboard diving and its local flight agent can purchase the tickets on your behalf, however, in doing so, Premier liveaboard diving is only acting as an agent for the airline and is not responsible for, and can accept no responsibility for, cancellations, delays, schedule changes, or problems caused by the air carrier. We highly recommend trip interruption and cancellation insurance.

Euphoria - specs

Inquiry
DIMENSIONS AND SPECIFICATION
Hull wooden Ship type motor - saling yacht
Decks 5 Masts 2
Tonnage 195 tons Draft 3 meters
Overall length 42 meters Width 8,5 meters
Engine 650 HP Generators 60 kVA, 40 kVA, 20 kVA
Cruising speed 8 - 9 knots Range 2000 nautical miles
Fresh water 5 000 liters Desalination 12 000 liters per day
220V outlet non stop 24V outlet 24 hours (in case of emergency)
Passengers 18 persons Crew 12 persons
NAVIGATION AND COMMUNICATION
GPS yes Plotter yes
Sonar yes Fishing sonar yes
Satelite phone yes UKF SSB
Radar yes
SECURITY
Life raft 3 x 15 prs. Life jackets 40
Rescue buoy 3 First aid kit yes
Fire protection system yes Fire protection alarm yes
EPIRP yes Oxygen yes
Decompresion chamber no Defibryllator no
DIVING EQUIPMENT
Compressors 2 x 570 LPM, 1 x 450 LPM Tanks 44
Nitrox soon Weight belts yes
Diving deck yes Showers yes
English speaking service yes Dive boat 1 inflatable 6,5 m, 200 HP
Equipment rental yes Dive boat 2 inflatable 6,5 m, 115 HP
Diving school present Dive boat 3 pontoon 4,7 m, 40 HP
CABIN EQUIPMENT
Bathroom yes Toilet yes
Shower hot Wardrobe / cup board yes
Air conditioning yes 220V oultets yes
TV soon DVD soon
Cabins on lower deck (Kingsize, Twin oraz Front) are equipped with portholes, VIP cabins has big windows with spacious terasse and skylights.
COMMON ROOMS / DINING ROOM
Air conditioning yes Sofa yes
TV yes DVD yes
Speakers yes Computer yes
BAR
Beer yes Wine yes
Liquoirs yes Soft drinks yes
OPEN DECK EQUIPMENT
Sun deck yes Covered part yes
Chairs yes Mattresses yes
Tables soon

Euphoria - diving

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The coral triangle is home to the world’s most bio-diverse population of marine species with Indonesia representing its hottest spot. Nowhere else has a comparable density, not to mention diversity, of underwater creatures and life been recorded.

In order to fully appreciate the exceptional status of this region, suffice it to say that the whole Caribbean area has only 9% of the corals and 35% of the fish species found in Indonesian waters.

The reason for such a big difference is that the entire area of the Atlantic Ocean underwent a mass extinction of species during the last ice age. All types of corals and animals vanished during this period and the other species never regained the strength of their former numbers.

In Indonesia - the centre of this biodiversity triangle - the variety seen underwater is truly astonishing. In certain bays and around small islands, you can find more species than in the entire Caribbean. In a research report conducted in 1997 on the island of Flores, respected marine biologists Rudie Kuiter and Gerald Allen counted 1,133 species of fish just in Maumere bay. This is still the highest number of species of fish ever counted in a specific area.

In Wakatobi, the recorded number of species of fish is at least 430, and in Raja Ampat, the same Gerald Allen, world-famous ichthyologist, counted the incredible number of 284 different species of fish counted during a single dive. In the same area, 465 different species of corals were found. As a result, scientists nowadays believe that this destination is the world’s current no. 1 spot in terms of biodiversity.

Other world-class hubs of biodiversity include Manado and Lembeh, Central and South Sulawesi, Komodo, Flores, Alor and the Banda sea, to name just a few. It should therefore come as no surprise that these hotspots are considered among the ultimate destinations for divers - Raja Ampat diving photos - Komodo diving photos

Komodo

Drift diving, pelagics melting pot and critters maze: dive in one of the world’s hubs of underwater activity - read the Komodo diving blog

Bone rate and Selayar

One of Indonesia’s last unveiled treasures

Alor and Flores

An undisclosed diving treasure. Your craving for adventure will be fulfilled while sailing on the Atasita Liveaboard in these awe-inspiring waters full of unexplored treasures

Maluku

The unspoiled beauty of a remote paradise. These rarely visited seas have some of the world’s richest marine environments filled with unspoiled corals, tiny critters as well as pelagics

Raja Ampat

The most striking biodiversity on our planet

Cenderwasih bay: Biak, Manokwari, Mapia atoll

The best exploratory dive trip you can imagine

Central Sulawesi: Togean and Bangaii

One of the world’s most remarkable places for coral reef diversity

North Sulaweis: Manando and Lembeh

Critters extravaganza and breathtaking walls

Cenderawasih Bay :

a new dive destination on the world dive map for up close and personal whale shark encounters! The whale shark is the biggest fish in the world, which impresses and attracts divers with its charm and majesty. While eating only plankton and small fish - the whale shark is completely harmless to humans. Unfortunately its existence is in risk, due to humans’ activities and a low birth rate. Those giants can live even up to 100 years. To follow the whale shark we reach the Cenderawasih National Park, situated in the Cenderawasih Bay, on the north part of Indonesian’s province West Papua. The park, founded in 1993, has a size of 1 400 000 hectares and is the largest marine park in the whole Indonesia. The name “Cenderawasih” comes from the bird of paradise, which is a symbol of Papua. The park is located 250 kilometres away from Manokwari and includes pristine coast and dozens of inhabited islands. The closest villages are situated on bigger islands: Yap, Rumberpon, Roon and Mioswar.

Whalesharks - Suckers for a good time

Anybody who has ever encountered a whaleshark during a dive knows what an awe inspiring and humbling experience it can be. Like the graceful manta ray, whalesharks are great favourites with divers and just seem to glide though the water, without a care in the world, feeding on microscopic plankton and other small organisms while all you have to do is keep up with them for a photo or video scene. Now we present a whaleshark encounter like no other, the Cendrawasih Bay Big Boys.

In Indonesia it is common, from Bali all the way to West Papua, for fishermen to utilise floating bamboo rafts, anchored to the sea bed, to attract fish. Called FADs (fish aggregation devices) or, more traditionally in Indonesia, rompongs, they are employed in open water away from reefs to act like a floating weed bed habitat that will attract tiny fish and other marine life. Once a community has been established under the device it is not long before more and progressively larger fish are attracted to it and fishing can commence. Some of these floating fishing stations can be a bit of a hazard to shipping as they are sometimes moored way out to sea (in fact in Bali they have become a menace), some even having some sparse living accommodation attached. Many times while on a trip we have encountered them and our guests are fascinated, sometimes even refusing to believe what their purpose is as they are so remote.

Now, a variation of the rompong called a “bagan” is used in Cendrawasih Bay by the fishermen, almost all of whom are from Sulawesi incidentally. What these guys do is catch tiny baitfish in nets and suspend these as bait for the larger pelagics, to speed up the natural progression of life under the bagan. What happens here though is that they get a lot more than they bargain for. Whalesharks are not adverse to adjusting their planktonic diet with something a little more substantial, baitfish for example, so these monsters started to gather under the bagans and suck at the nets for a free meal. Fortunately for us, and more so for the whalesharks, the local fishermen took their presence as a good luck omen and in time struck up a relationship with them, to the point where they can now hand feed the sharks the same as you would a cow.

As an extension of the fishermen’s interaction with these animals, dive liveaboards are now visiting the bagans and the fishermen allow divers to get in the water with them to observe, film and photograph these majestic beasts at their leisure. As their free feed is static, the whalesharks tend to stick around for quite a time and as well as swimming around the platforms have adopted a “vertical in the water” feeding position unique to the area. A bonus to this whaleshark tea party is that it is also possible to catch a glimpse of some of the pelagics that the bagans are there to attract, with sightings of sailfish and marlins being recorded.

Manokwari Shipwrecks

Toward the end of the second world war, the US Navy began a push north west from the Solomon Islands in the hopes of containing and defeating the Japanese invaders. Under the command of General MacArthur, this successful offensive routed the enemy and began a process that was eventually called island hopping. The Japanese were put on the backfoot, but not without a fight, over Papua New Guinea, the Marshall Islands, West Papua, Micronesia, Halmahera and up into the Phillipines where they were finally defeated.

The remains of these conflicts have given divers and tourists today across the south west Pacific region a fascinating insight into the struggles of that time.

The sunken wrecks of Chuuk (Truk), Palau and the Phillipines are well known but Indonesia also bears some of the scars of war with scattered wrecks all over the archipelago from the HMAS Perth and USS Houston battle cruises lying in the Sunda Strait between Sumatra and Java to the famous Liberty Wreck at Tulamben, Bali, as well as many other not so well known sites. It is the Birdshead Seascape however, that has the largest concentration of sunken wartime artifacts and Dore Bay and the town of Manokwari probably have the most.

Manokwari town runs along the beautiful shoreline of Dore Bay, a natural deep water harbour backed by the 3,000 metre high Arfak mountain range and lower lying impenetrable jungle, forming a well protected and what the Japanese navy thought was a safe anchorage for their cargo and warships. The hills above the town bear the trademarks of Japanese occupation: they are riddled with tunnels used for storage, shelter and escape. General McArthur’s allied forces were based on the island of Biak 120 nautical miles away and were regularly attacking the Japanese at Manokwari with their aircraft. Unfortunately for the allies the Japanese had cracked their radio codes so were ready when the planes attacked their shipping; this led to a lot of them being shot down to join the bombed and sunken Japanese vessels already on the sandy seabed.

Inside of Dore bay itself are two islands, Mansinam, the largest, and Raimuti or Lemon Island, much smaller and appropriately shaped like a lemon. Coral reefs surround most of both of them and Mansinam has the dubious distinction of being the first place in Papua where, in 1855, two christian missionaries first set foot in the region. Their arrival heralded the spread, for better or worse, of christianity and its superstitious customs amongst most of the indigenous people of the islands and mainland.

While over 20 wrecks have so far been discovered, only five are easily diveable at the present time for liveaboards or land-based operations. Others are either too deep to reach on conventional scuba, are hard to find or are so bent and destroyed they are hardly worth diving. Luckily for us the five that are reachable are relatively unexplored, fairly pristine and rarely visited.

Good hard and soft coral growth and abundant marine life is also an advantage, while many still contain interesting artifacts and - with the exception of the Shinwa Maru - have not yet been properly identified. Let’s have a look at them.

The Cross Wreck

A Japanese coastal patrol boat 40 metres in length and lying in 19 metres of water on a flat sandy bottom. Upright although listing to one side it is possible to view the engine room, galley and radio room.

The Pasir Putih Wreck

Named for it’s closeness to the Pasir Putih beach this is another Japanese navy patrol boat. Around 30-35 metres (100-115 ft) long, sitting upright and between 13-22 metres (45-75 ft) deep on the reef slope. Depth charges can be observed on the stern and while others lie on the nearby slope.

The Pillbox Wreck

There is a large white cross on Mansinam Island commemorating the arrival of the aforementioned missionaries, in the water close to this monument is where the Pillbox Wreck lies. Sitting in depths of between 9 and 16 metres, this Japanese commercial cargo vessel is around 60 metres long and was pressed into wartime use as an ammunition carrier, some of which is still evident on the wreck today.

The Mupi Wreck

Not as much is known about the Mupi Wreck. This vessel is 40 metres (130 ft) long and lies upright on the sandy bottom with her decking at a depth of 9 metres (30 ft). The superstructure is draped in red and white soft corals and a metal pot can still be seen in position on the oven as well as bottles and yet more ammunition.

The Shinwa Maru

At 120 metres long and lying at a maximum depth of 35 metres the Shinwa Maru is the Manokwari wreck that so far we know the most about and also one of the best to dive. Located south east of Mansinam island this large Japanese transport ship has five holds and lies on her port side with her superstructure still intact. Featuring an abundance of marine life the Shinwa Maru was bombed as big holes can be seen where big holes should not be and she is loaded with a wealth of artifacts to discover.

Australian Plane Wreck

As with a lot of Pacific Ocean wreck sites, it is not only shipping that lies on the ocean floor, there are sometimes a lot of aircraft too and Manokwari is no exception. One planewreck that has been found here is what is believed to be a P-40N Kitty Hawk fighter. Lying at a depth of 27 metres (90 ft) this plane was thought to be used in allied operations by the Royal Australian Airforce before it’s demise.

Cendrawasih Reefs - True Exploration Diving

Getting back to more conventional Indonesian diving, the wide variation of coral reefs and walls of the park and the outer islands make up the latest area for true dive site exploration. Up until a couple of years ago liveaboards were rarely seen here and as it covers such a vast area, the bays sites still have to be properly logged, charted and described, the opportunities for new discoveries are almost endless. The outer islands of Biak, Supiori, Numfor, Num and Yapen are included here as well and although they have some known dive sites they also have many more reefs and even wrecks to be found.

The Padaido Archipelago

Originally called “Schoutenlands” after the famous Dutch seafarer William Schouten who first layed eyes on the islands in the 1600’s, the Padaido archipelago is another fine example of an area that is vying for our exploratory attention. Padaido - meaning “place of indescribable beauty” and numbering some 30 islands - is a group of wonderland of classic white sand beaches and spectacular undersea gardens in crystal clear waters.

Sea mounts and Sunken Reefs

Diving on reefs and mounts that are isolated out at sea is always an exciting experience and inside the huge bay at Cendrawasih there is a wealth of shallow reef systems and connected sea mounts, such as Tydeman Reef, that become exposed at low tide and these offer yet another facet to an already bewildering variety of dive exploration opportunities.

Marine Life

When it comes to marine life and leaving the amazing whalesharks aside for a while, the bay also features a fine cross section of Indonesian marine animals with most of the usual suspects represented. With the addition of Wobbegong sharks that are normally, but not exclusively, spotted at Raja Ampat and the rare leatherback turtle that is hard to find anywhere else in Indonesia, Cendrawasih’s animal list begins to look better and better. Marine mammals pop up too with schooling dolphins being a common topside site and, the sluggish but no less fascinating dugong can be seen grazing in the mangrove and sea grass areas.

As previously mentioned, due to its inverted architecture, the Cendrawasih reefscape is one of the few places in the world where it is possible to observe and photograph marine species that normally live in far deeper water. This has opened up a whole new chapter for marine scientists who are now beginning to discover new species and variations in the bay to add to the already world beating numbers of Indonesian sea creatures.

Topside Nature Reserves

Cendrawasih Bay retains a natural beauty becoming of the south pacific and is a treasure trove for the nature lover, both marine and terrestrial. The bay and outer islands, as well as the 450 sq kilometre Arfak Nature Reserve close to Manokwari, are home to a host of rare creatures normally only seen in books or TV documentaries. Living in the lowlands, gorges and hilly forests, these creatures are endemic to the area and include forest wallabies, tree kangaroos, possums, bandicoots and the sleepy and secretive cuscus - native to Papua and north Australia, this large marsupial is a member of the possum family.

Birders’ Paradise

The whole continental-sized island of Papua has, along with the Amazon, the largest concentration of bird life on the planet with west Papua being the home of the elusive and rare Birds of Paradise. In the Arfak Reserve, it is reckoned that 320 bird species have been recorded, with around 50% of these endemic to the region. The huge frigate bird congregations out on the rocky islets in the bay and the ornithological delights on the mainland and larger islands make Cendrawasih Bay a birders’ paradise.

Euphoria in Cendrawasih Bay Once again, the diverse underwater and stunning topside worlds of Indonesia have combined to produce yet another wonderful destination, with something very special for every adventurous diver and intrepid traveler the world over. Let Euphoria be your luxury home away from home in this beautifully unique part of the world.

Euphoria - faqs

Inquiry

Q: What time zone is Indonesia located?
A: Raja Ampat is covered by Eastern Indonesia Standard Time which is 9 hours ahead of GMT.

Q: What if I am prone to sea sickness?
A: If you are prone to sea sickness we strongly urge you to bring some motion sickness medication.

Q: Do I need evacuation/dive insurance?
A: We strongly recommend that each guest purchase comprehensive evacuation and dive accident insurance. We will be operating in extremely remote areas. Emergency evacuations from remote locations can cost in excess of USD $100,000. We recommend Divers Alert Network (DAN): www.DiversAlertNetwork.org (in USA), www.daneurope.org (in Europe).

Q: What can I expect the water temperature to be and what wetsuit do you recommend?
A: This is always a difficult question to answer because people have different reactions to temperature. Typically temperatures range from 25-30C or 80-86F so usually a 3mm suit or even a skin is fine. recommended.

Q: Can I drink alcohol and dive?
A: No. Drinking alcohol and diving can increase your risk of decompression problems. You can drink alcohol once your have completed your last dive of the day.

VISIBILITY:

Depending on the season the visibility range is between 10-40 metres or 30-120 feet.

CURRENT:

All diving areas are subject to currents that range from slight to extremely strong. Dive sites are selected according to currents with some great year round drift diving opportunities.

NIGHT DIVING:

An opportunity to see some of the world’s most unique marine species that emerge only after the sun has set.

WALLS:

In Raja Ampat the islands are mainly made of limestone. Both areas offer great wall diving opportunities with both drift and no current situations.

CANYONS:

Due to the volcanic origins and easily eroded limestone the underwater topography is littered with canyons and gullies.

MARINE LIFE:

The areas where we dive are unmatched for small and unusual marine wildlife. The species list is endless and new ones are still being discovered in these areas. Whales, manta rays, sharks and larger pelagic species are found in the dive sites with higher currents. Strong currents and up-wellings transport nutrient-rich waters throughout these areas.

CLIMATE:

The average air temperature in the regions we visit ranges from 25 - 32 Celsius or 77-90 Fahrenheit.

HEALTH AND INOCULATIONS:

Vaccinations for typhoid, paratyphoid, tetanus, Cholera, Polio, and Hepatitis A are recommended. Malaria is endemic in many parts of Indonesia, please check with your local Tropical Disease Centre for anti-malaria/diver friendly medication.

MONEY:

The Indonesian currency is Rupiah. Rates fluctuate enormously, please check with our cruise directors for your cruise exchange rates.

POPULATION AND PEOPLE:

Regarded as the fifth most populous nation in the world, there are approximately 200,000,000 in Indonesia. The majority, around 60% reside on the island of Java.

RELIGION:

An amazing diversity of religions exists. Predominantly a Muslim nation, islands like Timor, North Sulawesi and Flores are Christian. Hinduism is found mainly in Bali. Scattered throughout the region are a variety of other beliefs. LANGUAGE: Bahasa Indonesia, almost identical to Malay is the one national language. Several local dialects exist in each region as well. English is widely spoken in the more popular tourist destinations such as Bali.

Q: What time zone is Indonesia located?
A: Cendrawasih is covered by Eastern Indonesia Standard Time which is 9 hours ahead of GMT.

Q: What if I am prone to sea sickness?
A: If you are prone to sea sickness we strongly urge you to bring some motion sickness medication.

Q: Do I need evacuation/dive insurance?
A: We strongly recommend that each guest purchase comprehensive evacuation and dive accident insurance. We will be operating in extremely remote areas. Emergency evacuations from remote locations can cost in excess of USD $100,000. We recommend Divers Alert Network (DAN): www.DiversAlertNetwork.org (in USA), www.daneurope.org (in Europe).

Q: What can I expect the water temperature to be and what wetsuit do you recommend?
A: This is always a difficult question to answer because people have different reactions to temperature. Typically temperatures range from 25-30C or 80-86F so usually a 3mm suit or even a skin is fine. recommended.

Q: Can I drink alcohol and dive?
A: No. Drinking alcohol and diving can increase your risk of decompression problems. You can drink alcohol once your have completed your last dive of the day.

VISIBILITY:

Depending on the season the visibility range is between 10-40 metres or 30-120 feet..

CLIMATE:

The average air temperature in the regions we visit ranges from 25 - 32 Celsius or 77-90 Fahrenheit.

HEALTH AND INOCULATIONS:

Vaccinations for typhoid, paratyphoid, tetanus, Cholera, Polio, and Hepatitis A are recommended. Malaria is endemic in many parts of Indonesia, please check with your local Tropical Disease Centre for anti-malaria/diver friendly medication.

MONEY:

The Indonesian currency is Rupiah. Rates fluctuate enormously, please check with our cruise directors for your cruise exchange rates.

POPULATION AND PEOPLE:

Regarded as the fifth most populous nation in the world, there are approximately 200,000,000 in Indonesia. The majority, around 60% reside on the island of Java.

RELIGION:

An amazing diversity of religions exists. Predominantly a Muslim nation, islands like Timor, North Sulawesi and Flores are Christian. Hinduism is found mainly in Bali. Scattered throughout the region are a variety of other beliefs.

LANGUAGE:

Bahasa Indonesia, almost identical to Malay is the one national language. Several local dialects exist in each region as well. English is widely spoken in the more popular tourist destinations such as Bali.